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News

All the latest from the trade & industry

06

July–August 2014

More news online at

www.motorcycletrader.net

– Updated every day.

Got a story? E-mail

news@motorcycletrader.net

Oxford seeks historic bikes

Following the recent opening of its new distribution

centre, Oxford Products is on the hunt for some of

its historic race machinery to decorate the facility. It

welcomes help in unearthing the bikes that helped to

build the Oxford brand, such as Ducati 888s raced

by Trevor Nation, Robert Dunlop, Steve Hislop, Jim

Moodie and Jeremy McWilliams, and Peckett-McNabb

Kawasakis from the late-Seventies. If you can help,

contact marketing director Henry Rivers Fletcher at

henry@oxprod.com

or 01993 862 300.

Bridgestone to be TOP

Bridgestone has entered into an agreement with the

International Olympic Committee (IOC) to become an

official TOP (The Olympic Partner) for the 2016, 2020

and 2024 Olympic Games. The announcement was

made in Tokyo at a press conference and ceremonial

signing of the TOP agreement attended by, among

others, IOC President Thomas Bach and Masaaki

Tsuya, Bridgestone CEO and chairman of the board.

Dave Bickers dies

Motocross legend and former trade kingpin Dave

Bickers passed away on 6th July. A post on Dave’s son

Paul Bickers’ Facebook page reads:

“It is with great sadness that I am announcing the

passing of my father Dave Bickers. He left us peacefully

early this morning 6th July. All of his family at his side.

His daughter Andrea is making it back from Brisbane

Australia just in time to be with rest of the family.

The stroke was very severe and he could not win the

fight against the damage caused. We plan to have a

celebration of his life in the not too distant future.

Details of this will follow when arrangements have

been made.”

IAM: ‘Accidents increasing in

20mph zones’

New figures flag up safety concerns over low

speed limits

The number of serious accidents on 20mph roads has

increased by over a quarter (26 per cent) since last year,

according to analysis of government data by road safety

charity the Institute of Advanced Motorists (IAM).

Slight accidents on 20mph roads increased by 17 per

cent. Casualties in 20mph zones also saw a rise; serious

casualties increased by 29 per cent, while slight casualties

went up by 19 per cent.

In the same year, there was a decrease in serious and

slight accidents on 30mph roads and 40mph roads, claims

the IAM. Serious accidents went down nine per cent on

30mph roads and seven per cent on 40 mph roads. There

was a five per cent reduction in slight accidents on 30mph

roads and a three per cent decrease on 40mph roads.

IAM chief executive Simon Best said: “More and more

roads are being given a 20mph limit but they do not seem

to be delivering fewer casualties. The IAM are concerned

that this is because simply putting a sign on a road that still

looks like a 30mph zone does not change driver behaviour.

More evaluation and research is needed into the real world

performance of 20mph limits to ensure limited funds are

being well spent.”

Industry’s Master security scheme

showing success

Tagged bikes four times less likely to be stolen

The Motorcycle Crime Reduction Group has released figures

showing a marked reduction in the theft of motorcycles

tagged under the Master security scheme.

Since January 2013, 52,687 new motorcycles and

scooters have been protected and registered with the scheme

and to date, of which only 403 have been stolen. This

represents a theft rate of 0.76 per cent, compared to an

historic rate of 2.6 per cent, meaning marked bikes may be

nearly four times less likely to be stolen.

Of the 403 bikes stolen, the current recovery rate stands

at 37 per cent. In addition, the police are aware of the

locations of a number of the unrecovered bikes, which will

be the subject of police action in the coming weeks.

MCIA chief Steve Kenward said: “We’re beginning to see

the effects of the Master scheme... we are highly encouraged

by the results we have seen so far.”